in , , ,

Sazerac

a glass of Sazerac cocktail with ingredients as background

With each and every taste, the Sazerac is more than just a beverage; it is a trip through history from beginning to end. Over the course of my career as a bartender, I have created a great number of cocktails; and, the Sazerac is one of the drinks that stands out to me. It stands out because of its unique mix of tastes and interesting history. This drink, the Sazerac, will surprise you with its deep roots and rich taste, no matter how experienced you are with cocktails or how new you are to them.

This post may include affiliate links; for details, see our disclosure policy

Tasting Notes

Sazerac has a lot of different tastes. First, there is a strong rye whiskey base. Next, there is a hint of herbal sweetness from the absinthe and the spicy warmth of Peychaud’s Bitters. The result is a drink that is complex, smells good, and has a smooth end. Its perfect mix of sweetness and spice makes it unique, with a taste that’s both energizing and comforting.

Equipment and Glassware

Three things are needed to make the perfect Sazerac:

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. Rye whiskey
  • 1 sugar cube
  • 2 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
  • A splash of absinthe
  • Lemon peel for garnish

Instructions

  1. Start by chilling an old-fashioned glass.
  2. In a mixing glass, muddle the sugar cube with Peychaud’s Bitters.
  3. Add rye whiskey and fill the mixing glass with ice.
  4. Stir well until the mixture is well-chilled.
  5. Rinse the chilled glass with absinthe, discarding the excess.
  6. Strain the whiskey mixture into the glass.
  7. Garnish with a twist of lemon peel.
See also  Top 7 Must-Try Whiskeys for Beginners

Pro Tips

Use a cold glass and a real sugar cube for the most genuine experience. If you want to get the most out of the drink, don’t forget to rinse the glass with absinthe. The texture will be smoother if you stir the liquid instead of shaking it. Lastly, squeezing the lemon peel over the drink gives it a fresh citrus smell that goes well with everything else.

When to Serve

Anytime is a good time to have a Sazerac, but it really shines after dinner. It’s a great way to start a chat or relax at night because of its complex flavor profile. Serve it when you want to show off your style or have a classy moment by yourself.

Which Liquor Brands to Choose

Your Sazerac cocktail will taste better if you use the right types of liquor. You should use Sazerac Rye or Rittenhouse as your base because they have the right amount of spice and sweetness. Peychaud’s Bitters is a must-have because of its genuine, spicy-sweet taste. Lucid or Pernod are great for adding the green notes that absinthe needs without making the drink too strong. When mixed together, these ingredients make the Sazerac’s signature, strongly scented taste.

Similar Cocktails

  • Old Fashioned: A classic cocktail that shares the Sazerac’s base of whiskey and bitters.
  • Manhattan: Another whiskey-based favorite, but with sweet vermouth and a cherry garnish.
  • Vieux Carré: A New Orleans classic with rye, Cognac, sweet vermouth, and Benedictine.
  • Whiskey Sour: For those who enjoy the citrusy edge in their cocktails.
  • Mint Julep: A refreshing choice with a minty kick, perfect for warmer weather.
See also  5 Must-Try Seagram's 7 Whiskey Cocktails

History

One of the oldest drinks in America, the Sazerac has roots in New Orleans dating back to the 1800s. Originally made with Cognac and then rye whiskey, it has changed over time while staying true to its roots. There is a story behind the Sazerac, and every sip brings the spirit of New Orleans to life.

Save Recipe Form

a glass of Sazerac cocktail with ingredients as background

Sazerac

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
5 from 2 votes
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: American
Keyword: absinthe, Peychaud’s Bitters, Rye Whiskey, sazerac, Whiskey
Servings: 1
Author: Paul Kushner
Learn about the Sazerac, a traditional drink with a long history that combines rye, absinthe, and Peychaud's Bitters.

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Rye whiskey
  • 1 pc sugar cube
  • 2 dashes Peychaud's Bitters
  • A splash of absinthe
  • Lemon peel for garnish

Instructions

  • Start by chilling an old-fashioned glass.
  • In a mixing glass, muddle the sugar cube with Peychaud's Bitters.
  • Add rye whiskey and fill the mixing glass with ice.
  • Stir well until the mixture is well-chilled.
  • Rinse the chilled glass with absinthe, discarding the excess.
  • Strain the whiskey mixture into the glass.
  • Garnish with a twist of lemon peel.
Tried this recipe?Leave a comment and let us know how it was!
Sazerac
Please drink responsibly, be fully accountable with your alcohol consumption, and show others respect.

Leave a Reply

Avatar

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




Paul Kushner

Written by Paul Kushner

Founder and CEO of MyBartender. Graduated from Penn State University. He always had a deep interest in the restaurant and bar industry. His restaurant experience began in 1997 at the age of 14 as a bus boy. By the time he turned 17 he was serving tables, and by 19 he was bartending/bar managing 6-7 nights a week.

In 2012, after a decade and a half of learning all facets of the industry, Paul opened his first restaurant/bar. In 2015, a second location followed, the latter being featured on The Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

Follow them on LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, Youtube, Google Guide and MuckRack.

vegas bomb with ingredients

Vegas Bomb

bay breeze cocktail

Bay Breeze